Advocacy

State Department Hosts Exhibit Celebrating 100 years of U.S.-Baltic Diplomacy

The U.S. Diplomacy Center (USDC) will host an exhibit for the month of June highlighting diplomatic relations between the U.S. and the Baltic nations of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania from 1918 to the present.  The Joint Baltic American National Committee (JBANC) and its parent organizations – the Estonian American National Council (EANC), American Latvian Association (ALA) and Lithuanian American Council (LAC) – were invited by the Department of State to prepare a display depicting the history of the U.S.-Baltic relationship.  The exhibit officially opens on May 30, 2018.

Panel 1

     A snapshot of the exhibit

The exhibit consists of three panels, each covering one of the major periods in Baltic history and how the U.S. played a role in each era.   The first panel shows the period starting from 1918, when the nations first declared independence and enjoyed over twenty years of freedom.  The second panel starts in 1940 with the division of Europe and covers the Soviet era, ending with the first Baltic grassroots demonstrations for renewed freedom.  The final period is from 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union to the Baltic nations’ current status as members of NATO and significant players on the world stage.  The exhibit will also include a display case with artifacts from the three time periods.

Visitors to the exhibit are able to access the USDC lobby via the entrance at 330 21st St NW.  The displays are located in the back right corner of the lobby.  Hours of access are Monday to Friday, 9:00-5:00 and the exhibit will be on display through June 28th.  Groups of five or more people arriving together need to make an appointment; for more information, please contact Leslie Goodman, Nordic Baltic Public Diplomacy Desk Officer at 202-647-5624.

USDC rendering

An artist’s view of the U.S. Diplomacy Center

The space for the USDC was dedicated in 2000 by then Secretary Madeleine Albright.  It was envisioned as a museum to “educate and inspire all visitors…showcas[ing] how diplomacy has shaped our nation’s history and how diplomacy continues to play a vital role in their lives,” according to its website at diplomacy.state.gov.  The project has been supported by every former Secretary of State since Warren Christopher.  Construction of the pavilion broke ground in September 2014 and was completed in January 2017, enabling completion of exhibition design and fabrication.

Credit for developing the U.S.-Baltic diplomacy exhibit is shared by members of JBANC, its parent organizations, and other supporters.  The project was led by JBANC Managing Director Karl Altau, EANC Washington, DC Director Karin Shuey, ALA Museum Director Lilita Bergs, and LAC representative on the JBANC board Henry Gaidis.  All were instrumental in gathering artifacts and photos, writing copy, and contributing to its design.  A large number of artifacts in the display case came from the personal collection of Mr. Gaidis and from the Latvian Museum in Rockville, Maryland.  The Estonian Archives in the U.S. were very generous in allowing access to their photo archives.  Finally, the graphic displays would not have been possible without the talent and dedicated work of Estonian American graphic designer Kristina Jõgi of Baltimore.

JBANC will work with the State Department and Baltic embassies to find other locations for the exhibit once this showing closes.  All involved look forward to sharing the work with as many interested parties as possible and hope to see a steady stream of visitors through the USDC to learn more about the history of U.S.-Baltic relations.

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Advocacy

Advocacy Day Draws Baltic American Activists

Estonian Americans from Maryland, Virginia and Ohio joined over 80 Baltic Americans from across the U.S. on May 3rd for Baltic Advocacy Day 2018.  The event was coordinated jointly by the American Latvian Association, American Latvian Youth Association, Joint Baltic American National Committee, Estonian American National Council, and Lithuanian American Council.  The group held meetings with over 50 Congressional offices representing 18 states to discuss issues important to the region.  The day ended with panel discussions featuring experts on Russia sanctions and disinformation.

BAD group photo

Over 80 Baltic Americans gathered in DC to advocate for the Baltics.  Photo by Jonas Cyvas

Participating constituents met largely with foreign relations and foreign affairs staffers in their Senators’ and Representative’s offices.  Their discussions highlighted the importance of continued support for NATO’s presence in the region, implementation of sanctions against the Putin regime, combatting disinformation, and securing the region’s energy supplies.  Participants also thanked the Senate offices for passing a resolution congratulating the Baltic nations on the centennials they are celebrating this year and asked their Representatives to support H.Res.826, a similar resolution working its way through the House.  Senators and Representatives were also asked to consider joining the Senate Baltic Freedom and House Baltic Caucuses.

The afternoon panel event, in the Rayburn House Office Building, was titled Prescriptions for the Information War and Sanctions Policy and was standing room only.  The first panel, on Using Sanctions to Force Change; Development, Implementation, and Enforcement Challenges in the Current Climate, included Latvian Member of Parliament and former ambassador to the U.S. Ojars Kalnins; Human Rights First Senior Vice President Rob Berschinski; and Kyle Parker, Chief of Staff for the U.S. Helsinki Commission.  They highlighted the effectiveness of exposing corruption and human rights violators and agreed that sanctions should do harm to regimes and oligarchs, not ordinary citizens.

The second panel, Hostile Influences at Home and Abroad; Fighting State-Sponsored Disinformation, featured Vladimir Kara-Murza, Vice Chairman of Open Russia; Vineta Mekone of the NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Excellence in Latvia; and Brian Whitmore, Director of the Russia program at the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA) and author of the Power Vertical blog.  They stressed the need to counter disinformation through truth and exposure of propagators, education of media consumers, and legal regulations against bots and other modern propaganda tools.  The West should also do a better job of sharing the story of democracy, who we are, and what we stand for in terms that the target audience can relate to.  Understanding how opposing messages are delivered and received is another important aspect of creating an effective defense against disinformation.  The panelists recognized the great work happening in the Baltics to address the issue and encouraged teamwork at all levels, from local engagement to national governments and NATO, to make a difference in addressing the problem.

Participants were resoundingly enthusiastic and satisfied with the day’s results.  There was consensus that Baltic Advocacy Day should become an annual event.  EANC thanks the organizers, panelists, participants and offices that made time to meet with us for making it a successful day.  We will keep our readers informed on next year’s event and what can be done in the meantime!

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